Ecomusicology

Curated by

Music and Coal Activism: Perspectives from the Field

Travis D. Stimeling, West Virginia University

Saro Lynch-Thomason, Blair Pathways, Asheville, NC

Nate May, College-Conservatory of Music, University of Cincinnati

The Naturalization of Built Environments: Two Case Studies

Historians have, in the last decade or so, expanded their approach to the past to include sensory experiences.  Sounds and ways of listening to them—what people heard, what sounds had meaning to them—have been established as an important way to understand the past (Johnson 1995; Picker 2003; Smith 2000; Sterne 2003; Thompson 2002).  The senses are at, indeed form the very foundation of, the unstable intersection of nature

Teaching Ecomusicology

This piece originally appeared in the October 2012 issue of the Ecomusicology Newsletter.

 

Discussion: Music in the Anthropocene

Editor's Note: In this short piece, composer Nathan Currier responds to an article by Mark Perlman that appeared in a prior issue of the Ecomusicology Newsletter and previews a longer article of his own, "Classical Music in the Anthropocene," which appeared in a later issue of that publication and can be read

Reclaim & Sustain: Homemade Instruments in Music Education

What is made of wood, animal gut, horsehair, flaxseed oil, and sometimes a bit of toad or lizard skin? It sounds like a base for a magic potion, but in fact it is the ingredients for the most valuable musical instrument today: the violin and its bow. Although many of its materials are now considered exotic, the violin and many other “professional” instruments had humble beginnings.

Serenading the Mountains

As humans, we are intimately connected to the world around us. Similarly music intimately connects us individually. It makes perfect sense that there would be a field studying the connection between the two. Without knowing it, I began my journey to ecomusicology as a child.

Pages

"Sounding Board" is intended as a space for scholars to publish thoughts and observations about their current work. These postings are not peer reviewed and do not reflect the opinion of Ethnomusicology Review. We support the expression of controversial opinions, and welcome civil discussion about them. We do not, however, tolerate overt discrimination based on race, sex, gender, sexual orientation, or religion, and reserve the right to remove posts that we feel might offend our readers.
Subscribe to RSS - Ecomusicology